Chesley Bonestell «Trip to the Moon» 1946.

submitted on Thu, 2006-03-23 01:55. | | | | |

Chesley Bonestell, Trip to the Moon
Circling the Moon, the rocket passes 200 miles above the crater Albategnius.
Seen from the earth, Albategnius is in the center of the moon's visible disk.

Chesley Bonestell, Trip to the Moon
Descending to 30 miles, the rocket passes over Aristarchus, the moon's brightest crater.
Fissure at the top is known on lunar maps as Schroeter's Canyon.
Chesley Bonestell, Trip to the Moon
Coming in to Land, the rocket descends over 10,000-foot Mt. Pico. The bleak
landscape is entirely of broken rock, since there is no water to erode river valleys.

«Trip to the Moon» Life magazine March 4 1946.

Chesley Bonestell, Trip to the Moon
Bonestell sculptural model for paintings above.

Chesley Bonestell, Trip to the Moon
On the moon's surface the tiny figures of the rocket's occupants (at the lower right)
view their earth, shining brilliantly in the lunar night. Since the earth is a better reflecting surface than the moon, its light is 20 times brighter than moonlight. For comparative size, the earth is shown near the belt of the constellation Orion.

Chesley Bonestell, Trip to the Moon
Model for painting above.

«As my knowledge of the technical side of the motion picture industry broadened, I realized I could apply camera angles as used in the motion pictures studio and illustrate 'travel' from satellite to satellite, showing Saturn exactly as it would look». ~ Chesley Bonestell.

sources: bonestellgallery.com, bonestell.com

Art copyright © Bonestell Space Art, used with permission